SWEDISH
NEUTRON
SCATTERING
SOCIETY

Advancing the use of neutrons for Swedish research

What is SNSS?

The Organisation

SNSS is an organisation open to all those who are using, or interested in the use of, neutron scattering techniques. There are currently about 200 members. SNSS is affiliated to the European Neutron Scattering Association (ENSA).

Neutron Scattering

Neutron scattering, the scattering of free neutrons by matter, can refer to either the physical process or the experimental technique which uses this process for the investigation of materials. Neutron scattering as a physical process is of primordial importance in nuclear engineering.

Membership

Become a part of a SNSS and the expansive network that has put Sweden on the neutron scattering map.

The Board

With the intention of reflecting as many of the Swedish universities active in the neutron scattering community, SNSS employs a roster of board members from universities all over Sweden.

SNSS Travel Grants

A limited number of grants per year will be available to promote the participation of bachelor and master students in experiments at large scale facilities for neutron scattering. Each grant consists of 10 000 SEK and will be used to cover transportation costs, accommodation, and meals.

Documents

The formal statutes of the Swedish Neutron Scattering Society, delineating the goals and guidelines of the society.

Interested in neutron scattering?

Available Funding

Research

Research Area

Meet the SNSS scientists contributing to the neutron scattering field.

Research Facilities

Read the articles that the research has resulted in.

Swedish Infrastructure

Find out what funding is available to researchers wanting to contribute to the neutron scattering field

News & Events

  1. BESS 2022

    June 13 - June 15
  2. ICNS 2022

    August 21 - August 25
  3. SAS 2022

    September 11 - September 16

In neutron scattering experiments, neutrons are fired at a nuclei of atoms in molecules and materials. When the uncharged particles collide with  the sample material, they change direction – they scatter. This gives unique information on structure and dynamics of molecules and materials.

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